A neutral beige backgroun with the words "worried you won't have enough if you don't declutter?" overlayed on top in a black font with pink accents

Scarcity: worried you won’t have enough?

You don’t need to stop having a scarcity mindset. You just need to acknowledge the reasons you are worried. 

Decluttering is a loss. We are letting things go and choosing to have less stuff. Plus, society has started to throw around the term “scarcity mindset” as much as they used “unprecedented” in 2020. Get the full transcription of this episode here. 

The thing that holds us back from this, is staying stuck in focusing on the loss. 

We stay stuck by focusing on the things we are losing.

Or even the money we spent on the things we are losing.

It’s not just something that happens when we declutter though. Society tells us, especially as women and mothers that we should contract and shrink and do more with less, just be grateful for what we do have. To

find ways to cut corners on everything when it comes to resources and money.

The message behind that is this: you won’t have enough. You probably don’t have enough right now. Buckle up and hold onto everything, and say yes to all the discounts and deals while they’re in front of you. Even if you’re overwhelmed by too much stuff already.

What if we approached our decisions on decluttering from an expansive lens though?

When I decluttered the loss and feelings of lack felt so intense I actually felt like I might cease to exist and that we wouldn’t have enough food or money in the future to give us shelter and keep us alive.

This is how deeply tied we can be to our stuff.

I wish that I would have had someone who told me how expansive decluttering really is though, so that I wouldn’t have hyper focused on the loss.

I wish someone would have told me how much spaciousness would exist in my home after decluttering. How much physical space I, and my family would have. More space to move around and to hold our stuff in an easy to navigate way.

How much time I would gain is something I would have loved to hear, too.

That I would go from complaining about never having time with my husband to being able to watch the entire series of friends start to finish because every single night when the kids went to bed we had time for each other. AND we got to work out every night together.

How much more money I would save. That my entire perspective on how I spent my money would change.

I would value a cash reserve over a supply reserve. And I would value intentional purchases over impulse purchases. And how I would feel empowered with my financial decisions because I was no longer shopping to fill a void, or to make myself feel like my kids knew I loved them.

The scarcity mindset of decluttering was so strong, I missed all the gains I would soon experience.

How much energy and confidence I would have because my mental load was dramatically reduced and I had time to address my childhood wounds through therapy, and true deep self care.

Here’s the thing. We are human. So when we declutter, all we see at first glance is the loss of resources, money and stuff.

I am here to tell you about the hidden and expansive world you are about to step into when you declutter.

I promise the gains you will have far outweigh any amount of stuff you will ever own.

[0:27] – scarcity/abundance mindset and how those labels are dismissive of our real feelings 

 

[2:49] – what society tells us 

 

[4:27] – acknowledge  your very real feelings

 

[5:47] – krista’s story 

 

[10:45] – what you gain by decluttering 

 

[11:50] – decluttering simplified motherhoodsimplified.com/declutteringsimplified

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